The Waterfront Walkway – April 2019

The South West Coastal path is the longest National Trail in Britain, totalling some 630 miles long. While it often offers stunning vistas over wave beaten cliffs, it does weave through cities along the way. One of which is our home – Plymouth. Over several small walks this past month Emily and I have walked the coastal path within the city limits; the Waterfront Walkway.

Tidal pools at Hooe Lake

From Admirals Hard to Jennycliff, covering the Hoe, Barbican and around Cattedown, Turnchapel to Mountbatten there are plenty of places to see and learn about. While the natural wonder of the Cornish or rugged Devon coastlines are not on offer, it is a fantastic opportunity to learn about the growth of Plymouth as a city and how important the coastline is to the area.

British coastal life

Plymouth City Council have done a great job of providing a detailed guide through all the historic areas of the city you will walk through (link to download below). With plenty of places to stop for food, coffee or a pint along the way, walking this section of the coastal path is rewarding for locals and visitors alike. I was able to show Emily far more of the city than we have previously explored and it got us out enjoying some of these fantastic early summers we have been lucky to have. A great excuse to explore our home!

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The Leviathan – locally known as the Barbican Prawn; one of the many ways the sea has influenced art and culture within the city

Links:

https://www.plymouth.gov.uk/sites/default/files/WaterfrontWalkway.pdf

https://www.southwestcoastpath.org.uk/

https://plymhearts.org/arts-and-culture/public-art/public-art-permanent/waterfront-walkway-various-artists/leviathan/